Avoid Malnutrition, Poisonous Foods And Unsafe Carriers

No discussion on hamster cages would be comlete without mentioning some of the foods that you should and should not feed them. Hamsters like all pets need specialist feeding to stop them getting unhealthy or even dying prematurely. They also need to be carried about safely to prevent escape, or injury, when they’re not in their cages. This article explains a good hamster diet, some tips for harmful foods and carriers. This should give you tips on avoiding injury through malnutrition and poor handling in transit to and from the vets or to your  pet-sitters while you’re away.
The Hamster 3 by abilio
What to feed
Hamsters need a varied diet. They are herbivores by nature and require grains, nuts and seeds. Buy this from a pet store as some can harm you hamster (see Stuff That Harms Hammies). They also need fresh, washed fruits and vegetables and constant access to fresh water. Hamster treat products can be given in moderation. You may want to consider organic food to avoid chemicals as hamsters weight little compares to ingestion intakes of other animals per grams of bodyweight. Considering hamster food, it’s also useful to know what to avoid.
What Not To Feed
Not all seeds, nuts, fruit and veggies are safe for hamsters. Known foods which can poison them include apple seeds avocado, cherry pits, eggplant, elderberries, grapes, horse chestnuts, mushrooms, onions, garlic, chives, peach pits, potatoes raisins, rhubarb and tomatoes (1, 2). NEVER try to improvise with human foods or plants from the home or garden. The safest way is to have your vet to provide a diet sheet of safe foods. Establishing a good diet is vital, as is having a good carrier for trips outside your home.

NEVER FEED TOMATOE

NEVER FEED TOMATOE

Hamster Carriers
You need one in case your hamster needs vet care or for when you go away on holiday to take him or her to a friends or professional pet-sitters.  Don’t be tempted to skip getting one – hamsters can easily escape from cardboard boxes and there may not be enough ventilation in one or another ‘DIY’ carrier. They range in price from a few $ or £ to more fancy versions but remember, your hamster won’t care what style it is, so long as its comfy and safe.

Small animal carriers and food are not always interchangeable – food stuffs must be nutritionally species appropriate and carriers the right size. It’s also not necessary to buy a flashy product with a hefty price tag, many supplies are inexpensive.  With some tips for a healthy diet and safe transportation, your hamster is more likely to live longer and avoid injuries.

IMPORTANT: IF YOU SUSPECT YOUR HAMSTER HAS EATEN OR CHEWED OR ‘POUCHED’ SOMETHING HARMFUL OR IS INJURED/HARMED IN ANY WAY, PLEASE ONLY TAKE IT TO THE VETS – DO NOT TRY TO DIAGNOSE USING THIS ARTICLE. IT CANOT COVER ALL THE FOODS AND SITAUTIONS THAT CAN BE DANGEROUS. LIKEWISE, PLEASE CONSULT YOU VET FOR YOUR INDIVDIUAL HAMSTERS NUTRITIONAL NEEDS AND STATUS.

Jonathon Boyd

References:
1. The Hamster Society. Husbandry – List of Poisonous Plants [onine]. Available from:

http://www.hamsoc.org.uk/husbandry.php

2. ASPCA. People Foods To Avoid Feeding Your Pets [online]. Available from:

http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/poison-control/people-foods.html

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